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prettyarchitecture:

Pretty Architecture presents: Glass houses S2E3

Milan-based architect Jacopo Mascheroni of JM Architecture designed this futuristic Swiss house with an eye toward the views, and the ultra-contemporary. The hillside home, perched overlooking Lake Lugano, makes the most of the breathtaking vistas through its expansive glazing, while adding a futuristic flair to the home’s look and feel. 

The live work house, home to a financial consultant and her family, is organized in two volumes – the glass-enclosed upper level with an open-concept living room, kitchen and bath; and below grade, the home’s private quarters include two baths, a laundry area, office, playroom, and three bedrooms that open onto a private courtyard. Light, airy yet striking, this glass wall house certainly stands out in this small town.

via The Cool Hunter

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The coming four days the remaining parts of the ‘glass-series’ are uploaded at 20:00 hrs (UTC+1).

the world has changed, and none of us can go back.

burning-young:

girls on their periods

I will never not reblog this.

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

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